Wellness and Reablement

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Wellness is an approach that involves assessment, planning and delivery of supports that build on the strengths, capacity and goals of individuals, and encourage actions that promote a level of independence in daily living tasks, as well as reducing risks to living safely at home.

Wellness as a philosophy is based on the premise that, even with frailty, chronic illness or disability, people generally have the desire and capacity to make gains in their physical, social and emotional wellbeing and to live autonomously and as independently as possible.

The wellness philosophy underpins all activities under the Commonwealth Home Support Programme (CHSP).  A wellness approach draws on the wellness philosophy to inform a way of working with people.  It therefore involves working with individuals, and their carers, to maximise their independence and autonomy.  The approach involves assessment, planning and delivery of supports that build on the strengths, capacity and goals of individuals, creatively addressing problems or barriers and encouraging actions that promote a level of independence in daily living tasks, as well as reducing risks to living safely at home. 

A wellness approach avoids ‘doing for’ when a ‘doing with’ approach can assist individuals to undertake a task or activity themselves, or with less assistance, and to increase satisfaction with any gains made.  It underpins all assessment and service provision, whether the need for assistance is episodic, fluctuates in intensity or type over time or is of an ongoing nature. 


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Reablement involves time-limited interventions that are targeted towards a person’s specific goal or desired outcome to adapt to some functional loss or regain confidence and capacity to resume activities. 

Like wellness, reablement aims to assist people to reach their goals and maximise their independence and autonomy.  However, reablement involves time-limited interventions that are more targeted towards a person’s specific goal or desired outcome to adapt to some functional loss or regain confidence and capacity to resume activities. 

Supports could include training in a new skill or relearning a lost skill, modification to a person’s home environment or having access to equipment or assistive technology.  Reablement is targeted to CHSP clients who are motivated to continue to undertake activities of daily living for whom time-limited supports can achieve an increase in independence.

In the CHSP, reablement is embedded within the assessment, referral and service pathway.  It will be overseen by Regional Assessment Services that will identify opportunities for clients to be as independent as is practical, potentially reducing the need for ongoing and/or higher levels of service delivery.


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The Department of Health & Human Services is supporting funded agencies to implement Wellness and Reablement, previously known as the Active Service Model (ASM) approach in Victoria, by having dedicated Wellness and Reablement consultants.

These Wellness and Reablement consultants are to:

  • be the key communication point for Wellness and Reablement developments and information within a division
  • help funded agencies within a division to gain a consistent understanding of Wellness and Reablement and its implications for practice and systems
  • provide practical operational support to agencies to put Wellness and Reablement into practice as a broad sustainable change management strategy
  • assist in the broader implementation of the Wellness and Reablement initiative by sharing information on barriers, enablers and practice learnings and developments at a local and statewide level.

For further information, please see the Living Well at Home Good Practice Guide or contact Carolyn Bolton, North Metro Wellness and Reablement Consultant, at carolynb@hwpcp.org.au or 0499 784 465.

Additional resources may be accessed via the Hume Whittlesea Primary Care Partnership (PCP) website.